Creative Curriculum

Creative Curriculum

At Lakeview Child Center, we introduce children to the joy of learning within a framework that places equal emphasis on intellectual curiosity and social responsibility. Young children acquire skills in a predictable sequence and thrive when learning at their own pace, according to their own temperament.

Creative Curriculum

Lakeview uses the Creative Curriculum to stimulate each child’s sense of exploration and discovery.

5 Components of the Creative Curriculum

  • How Children Develop and Learn
  • The Learning Environment
  • What Children Learn
  • The Teacher’s Role
  • The Family’s Role

The Creative Curriculum was introduced in 1978 and has evolved as we understand the value of helping teachers implement developmentally appropriate practices. With a firm foundation in research that addresses academic content, the curriculum holds programs accountable for demonstrating positive learning outcomes.

Offering a balance between applied general knowledge of child development and specific knowledge gained from relationships formed with each child and family, the Creative Curriculum weaves content learning into everyday experiences to ensure children’s success.

Our teachers prepare exciting, age-appropriate and individualized activities to help children develop a healthy self concept and a feeling of accomplishment. Classroom planning focuses on physical, cognitive, language and personal-social skills.

Through observation, we work to develop educational plans tailored to the needs of each child. The information gathered during observation is shared with families through progress reports and conferences.

5 Elements of Meaningful Play: To Develop Vital Life Skills

Element 1Element 2Element 3Element 4Element 5
Freedom to make decisions and choose. This leads to understanding consequences, better decision making and creativity.
A motivation from within the child. Children see value in playing with others, so they begin to self-regulate and learn to control their own needs.
Ability to get lost in the moment. During play, children get so engaged that they are able to suspend reality and take risks. This leads them to try new ideas and investigate their surroundings.
Freedom to change directions. When things go wrong or don’t work out, children become flexible in their thinking and decision making. They begin to learn how to solve problems.
Enjoyment. Engaging in play is fun and this emotional connection adds to the experience.
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